US Embassy Shuts Operations in Juba

The United States State Department on Tuesday shut down its operations in the South Sudan Capital, Juba due to violent clashes following a reported coup attempt against President Salva Kiir.

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon has called for peaceful and democratic dialogue between the government of South Sudan and its opponents

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon has called for peaceful and democratic dialogue between the government of South Sudan and its opponents

The Department has ordered the departure of non-emergency personnel from its embassy and also suspended normal operations.

 

With the increase of the death toll, the US citizens have been urged to “depart immediately”.

 

“U.S. citizens who choose to stay in South Sudan despite this warning should review their personal security situation and seriously reconsider their plans to remain,” the State Department said in the warning.

 

The White House spokesman Jay Carney also said, “Circumstances there have gotten worse and we remain deeply concern about developments in South Sudan”.

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He further called on Juba to open critical points of entry and exit, including the airport, as for Washington to evacuate some of its personnel and citizens from the country.

 

Carney said that the Obama administration is closely monitoring the situation and urges all parties in South Sudan to hammer out their differences “peacefully and democratically.”

 

Meanwhile, the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon has also called for peaceful and democratic dialogue between the two parties.

 

He urges the government of South Sudan to engage in dialogue with the opponents and to resolve differences peacefully in order to prevent any spread of current violence.

 

The United Nations received reports from local sources in South Sudan on Tuesday that between 400 and 500 people had been killed and up to 800 wounded in the latest violence, and the government said it had arrested 10 politicians in connection with a “foiled coup”.

 

“Two hospitals have recorded between 400 and 500 dead and (up to) 800 wounded,” a diplomat in New York said on condition of anonymity, citing an estimate United Nations peacekeeping chief Herve Ladsous gave during a closed-door briefing for the 15-member body.